Mental Health and Substance Use

Caring for your mental health is just as important as caring for your physical health. Don’t worry—we’re here to help.

Caring for your mental health is just as important as caring for your physical health. Don’t worry—we’re here to help.

Emergency? Get Confidential, 24/7 Support

If you’re thinking about suicide, are worried about a friend or loved one, or would like emotional support, confidential help is available 24/7—no referrals needed. Seeking help is a sign of strength. Using your health insurance to pay for services will never be a part of your employment record. Your privacy is completely protected.

If you are an EmblemHealth member, your mental health and substance use benefits are provided through our partner Beacon Health Options. Call 888-447-2526 for confidential, 24/7 support.

If you are a Montefiore member, your mental health and substance use benefits are provided through Montefiore. Call 800-401-4822 for confidential, 24/7 support.

Find a Provider – No Referral Needed

Is stress preventing you from enjoying the simple things in life? Are you using alcohol or drugs to get through a rough time? Whatever it is, our network of mental health professionals are here to help.

  • If you are an EmblemHealth member, call Beacon Health Options at 888-447-2526, 24/7 to find a mental health provider near you.
  • If you are a Montefiore member, call 800-401-4822, 24/7 to find a mental health provider near you.

 

If you’d prefer to search online for a provider, please follow these instructions.

EmblemHealth Members
Use the Find a Doctor tool and select “Mental Health and Substance Abuse”. This will take you to the Beacon Health Options “Find a Provider” search, which has information specific to your plan. Find providers by location, specialty and more.

 

Montefiore Members
If you’re a Montefiore member, please call 800-401-4822 to find a mental health provider.

 

EmblemHealth Neighborhood Care

Need help managing stress? Looking for a support group? EmblemHealth Neighborhood Care offers free health and wellness programs, open to all. Click here to find a location near you.

 

Crisis Hotlines

  • NYC Well is available to listen and help. It is free, confidential and available twenty-four hours a day/seven days a week.
    • Call: 888-NYC-WELL (888-692-9355)
    • Text: WELL to 65173
    • Chat: nyc.gov/nycwell
  • Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255. If you use a TTY/TDD, call 800-799-4889. It is free, confidential and available twenty-four hours a day/seven days a week.
  • Call the NYPD cop-to-cop mental health hotline (separate from the NYPD) if you’re a service member. POPPA: 88-COPSCOP (1-888-267-7267).

 

Understanding Your Coverage

It can be difficult dealing with life’s ups and downs. Maybe you are going through a divorce, recently had a death in the family or have been diagnosed with a chronic illness. Or, perhaps you have been drinking alcohol more often than casually or fear you have developed an addiction problem. Help is available.

The Emblem Behavioral Health Services program can help you understand your coverage for behavioral health and substance use issues and discuss your eligibility for additional support services and programs.

Medicaid members who are covered by HARP (Health and Recovery Plans) can also learn about setting up coverage through a care management system that coordinates physical and behavioral health services, known as a Health Home.

You can sign in to myEmblemhealth to find out about your coverage. Simply enter your user ID and password to get started.


Additional Resources

Download or print one of these quick guides for convenient access to the phone numbers and resources you might need.

Common Mental Health Conditions and Addictions

ADHD, which stands for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, is a condition that affects a person’s ability to concentrate and focus on tasks. It mostly affects children and adolescents, but can continue into adulthood for some people. As many as one in every 20 children are affected by it.1

Symptoms

You or your child may have some or all of the following symptoms, and experience them to different degrees:

  • Trouble concentrating or paying attention
  • Difficulty following directions
  • Moving and talking excessively, can’t sit still, restless
  • Easily bored
  • Impulsive behavior

Treatment

There are many ways to treat ADHD. Use the information below as a guide to help you understand your treatment options. Always speak with your doctor to determine the best treatment for you.

Psychological Counseling

Counseling or talk therapy can be an effective way to treat ADHD. It involves regular visits with a mental health professional who will help you or your child learn to cope with stress, manage excess energy and focus on tasks.
We can help you find a mental health professional.

ADHD Medication

Medication can be an effective tool in helping to treat ADHD. It works by balancing chemicals in the brain, which can help you to manage symptoms.

Tips about ADHD Medication

  • It is important to take ADHD medication as prescribed. Most side effects are minor and temporary. Discuss any side effects with your doctor so you can decide together if the treatment is right for you or your child.
  • ADHD medication may take time to work. You or your child may not notice a difference at first, so it is important to give them time.2
  • It is important to follow up regularly with the doctor. Schedule a follow-up appointment within 30 days of starting the medication so the doctor can make sure it is working correctly. Once you and your doctor have found the right medication plan, follow up every three months to make sure it continues to work for you or your child.
  • ADHD medications are most effective when taken at the same time each day.3 Try setting an alarm, using a pill box or taking the medication with regular activities to help make it a part of your daily routine.

1 Farone, Stephen. The worldwide prevalence of ADHD: Is it an American condition? The World Journal of Psychiatry. (2003)
2 Mental Health MedicationsNational Alliance on Mental Illness.
3 General Medication GuidelinesThe Cleveland Clinic Foundation. (2014)

It is common to worry or feel nervous at work or in your personal life, especially when faced with a big event such as giving an important presentation, attending a wedding or taking a big exam. However, when anxiety becomes severe and interferes with everyday living, it may signal an anxiety disorder.

Symptoms

There are different types of anxiety disorders, each with a different set of symptoms.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

  • Frequently worrying about many issues including health, money and everyday tasks
  • “Catastrophizing”; thinking or imagining the worst things that could happen
  • Feeling tense, both emotionally and physically

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

  • Recurrent, unwanted and intrusive thoughts
  • Rituals (otherwise known as compulsions) in reaction to these thoughts
  • Strict schedules or routines

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

  • Often follows a terrifying, traumatic event
  • Flashbacks to the traumatic event
  • Nightmares about the traumatic event
  • Feeling emotionally numb
  • Feeling irritable and easily startled

Social Anxiety Disorder

  • Feeling excessively nervous or self-conscious in social situations
  • Fear of being judged by others
  • Choosing to be alone rather than interacting with others

Treatment

There are many ways to treat anxiety. Use the information below as a guide to help you understand your treatment options. Always speak with your doctor to determine the best treatment for you.

Psychological Counseling

Counseling, also known as talk therapy, can be an effective way to treat anxiety. It involves regular visits with a mental health professional who will help you learn ways to cope with stress, manage your symptoms and improve your relationships. It is important to feel comfortable and safe with your mental health professional, and you may need to talk with a few to find one who feels right.

Anti-Anxiety Medication

Anti-anxiety medication can be an effective tool in helping to treat anxiety. It works by helping to balance chemicals in the brain, which can help you feel more like yourself again.

Tips about anti-anxiety medication

  • Keep taking your medication as prescribed. Most side effects are minor and temporary. Discuss any side effects with your doctor so you can decide together if the treatment is right for you.
  • Some anti-anxiety medications may take time to work. You may not feel better immediately, so it is important to give them time.1
  • Anti-anxiety medications are most effective when taken at the same time each day.2 Try setting an alarm, using a pill box or taking your medication with regular activities to help make it a part of your daily routine.

Find out if you may have anxiety

This screening can help determine if you are experiencing symptoms of anxiety. We encourage you to share your results with your health care provider.

Take this screening >

1 Mental Health MedicationsNational Alliance on Mental Illness.
2 General Medication GuidelinesThe Cleveland Clinic Foundation. (2014)

Everyone has ups and downs in their mood, but bipolar disorder is a condition that causes major mood shifts – from episodes of remarkably high energy (manic) to extreme lows (depression). Bipolar disorder can interfere with day to day living. It is a serious medical condition that can affect your thoughts, feelings and physical health.

Symptoms

Bipolar disorder may involve alternating manic and depressive episodes. You may have some or all of the following symptoms, and experience them to different degrees:

Manic Episode:

  • Feeling unusually optimistic, euphoric or invincible
  • Having extreme increase in energy and being more active than usual
  • Decreased need for sleep
  • Racing thoughts
  • Doing risky or dangerous things

Depressive Episode:

  • Frequently feeling very sad, “empty” or worthless
  • Losing interest in work, family or the things you normally enjoy
  • Eating and sleeping less or more than usual
  • Having little or no energy
  • Having trouble remembering things or making decisions

Treatment

There are many ways to treat bipolar disorder. Use the information below as a guide to help you understand your treatment options. Always speak with your doctor to determine the best treatment for you.

Psychological Counseling
Counseling or talk therapy can be an effective way to treat bipolar disorder. It involves regular visits with a mental health professional who will help you learn to cope with stress, understand and manage your emotions and improve your relationships. It is important to feel comfortable and safe with your mental health professional, and you may need to talk with a few to find one who feels right.

Bipolar Disorder Medication
Bipolar medications can be an effective tool in helping to treat bipolar disorder. They work by helping to balance chemicals in the brain, which can help you feel more like yourself again.

Tips about medication for bipolar disorder

  • Keep taking your medication as prescribed. Most side effects are minor and temporary. Discuss any side effects with your doctor so you can decide together if the treatment is right for you. Follow up regularly with your doctor to make sure the medication is working correctly for you.
  • Medication can take some time to work. You may not feel better for a few weeks, and it is important to give them time.1
  • Medications are most effective when taken at the same time each day.2 Try setting an alarm, using a pill box or taking your medication with regular activities to help make it a part of your daily routine.
  • If you’re taking a bipolar medication, talk to your doctor about getting a simple blood sugar test once a year to help monitor your health.

1 Mental Health MedicationsNational Alliance on Mental Illness.
2 General Medication GuidelinesThe Cleveland Clinic Foundation. (2014)

Eating disorders are characterized by dangerous eating behaviors that harm your health, emotions and ability to function. These disorders cause an obsession with food, weight and body shape. Eating disorders can be difficult to face due to cultural pressures to look a certain way.

Symptoms

There are three main types of eating disorders and symptoms vary among them. Some of the most common symptoms follow.

Anorexia Nervosa:

  • Frequently skipping meals
  • Obsession with calories
  • Frequent exercising
  • Unrealistic sense of personal appearance
  • Sudden or extreme weight loss

Bulimia Nervosa:

  • Forced vomiting after eating, sometimes after binge eating
  • Purging through fasting, excessive exercise and crash diets
  • Unrealistic sense of personal appearance

Binge Eating Disorder:

  • Eating very large quantities
  • Feeling unable to stop eating
  • Not purging after large binges

Treatment

There are many ways to treat eating disorders. Use the information below as a guide to help you understand your treatment options. Always speak with your doctor to determine the best treatment for you.

Psychological Counseling
Counseling or talk therapy can be an effective way to treat eating disorders. It involves regular visits with a behavioral health professional who will help you learn ways to cope with stress, manage your symptoms and improve your self-image and relationship with food. It is important to feel comfortable and safe with your behavioral health professional, and you may need to talk with a few to find one who feels right.

Medication
Medication can be an effective tool in helping to treat eating disorders. It works by helping to balance chemicals in the brain, which can help you feel more comfortable your self-image and eating habits.

Tips about medication

  • Keep taking your medication as prescribed. Most side effects are minor and temporary. Discuss any side effects with your doctor so you can decide together if the treatment is right for you. Follow up regularly with your doctor to make sure the medication is working correctly for you.
  • Medication can take some time to work. You may not feel better for a few weeks, and it is important to give them time. 1
  • Medications are most effective when taken at the same time each day.2 Try setting an alarm, using a pill box or taking your medication with regular activities to help make it a part of your daily routine.

Ready for help?

If you or someone you know has an eating disorder, call the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) Helpline at 1-800-931-2237 Monday through Thursday from 9 am to 9 pm and Friday from 9 am to 5 pm for support and guidance. This toll-free line is confidential.

You can also text “NEDA” to 741741 to be connected with a trained volunteer at Crisis Text Line or visit NEDA online and chat with a trained volunteer, take a free eating disorders screening or find more information on handling eating disorders.

1 Mental Health MedicationsNational Alliance on Mental Illness.
2 General Medication GuidelinesThe Cleveland Clinic Foundation. (2014)

Everyone feels sad sometimes, but depression is more than just normal sadness. It is a serious medical condition that can affect your thoughts, feelings and physical health.

Symptoms

Symptoms can differ from person to person, but some of the most common are:

  • Frequently feeling sad, “empty” or worthless
  • Often feeling hopeless
  • Losing interest in work, family or the things you normally enjoy
  • Eating and sleeping less or more than usual
  • Having little or no energy
  • Having trouble remembering things or making decisions

Treatment

There are many ways to treat depression. Use the information below as a guide to help you understand your treatment options. Always speak with your doctor to determine the best treatment for you.

Psychological counseling

Counseling, also known as talk therapy, can be an effective way to treat depression. It involves regular visits with a mental health professional who will help you learn ways to cope with stress, manage your symptoms and improve your relationships. It is important to feel comfortable and safe with your mental health professional, and you may need to talk with a few to find one who feels right.

Antidepressant medication

Antidepressant medication can be an effective tool in helping to treat depression. It works by helping to balance chemicals in the brain, which can help you feel more like yourself again.

Tips about antidepressants

  • Keep taking your medication as prescribed. Most side effects are minor and temporary. Discuss any side effects with your doctor so you can decide together if the treatment is right for you.
  • Some antidepressants may take time to work. You may not feel better immediately, so it is important to give them time.1
  • Antidepressants are most effective when taken at the same time each day.2 Try setting an alarm, using a pill box or taking your medication with regular activities to help make it a part of your daily routine.

Find out if you may have depression

This screening can help determine if you are experiencing symptoms of depression. We encourage you to share your results with your health care provider.

Take this screening >

1 Mental Health MedicationsNational Alliance on Mental Illness.
2 General Medication GuidelinesThe Cleveland Clinic Foundation. (2014)

Schizophrenia is a mental health condition that interferes with a person’s ability to think clearly, manage emotions, make decisions and relate to others. It can cause a person to see or hear things that aren’t real that affect mood and behaviors.

Symptoms

A person with schizophrenia may have some or all of the following symptoms, and experience them to different degrees:

  • Hallucinations: See, hear or feel things that are not there
  • Delusions: Believe something that is not true
  • Disorganized thinking: Have trouble collecting thoughts or communicating thoughts to others

Treatment

There are many ways to treat schizophrenia. Use the information below as a guide to help you understand your treatment options. Always speak with your doctor to determine the best treatment for you.

Psychological Counseling
Counseling or talk therapy can be an effective way to treat schizophrenia. It involves regular visits with a mental health professional who will help you learn to understand and manage your emotions. It is important to feel comfortable and safe with your mental health professional, and you may need to talk with a few to find one who feels right.

Schizophrenia Medication
Medications can be an effective tool in helping to treat schizophrenia. They work by balancing chemicals in the brain, which can help you feel more like yourself again.

Tips about medication for schizophrenia

  • Keep taking your medication as prescribed. Most side effects are minor and temporary. Discuss any side effects with your doctor so you can decide together if the treatment is right for you. Follow up regularly with your doctor to make sure the medication is working correctly for you.
  • Medication can take some time to work. You may not feel better for a few weeks, and it is important to give them time.1
  • Medications are most effective when taken at the same time each day.2 Try setting an alarm, using a pill box or taking your medication with regular activities to help make it a part of your regular routine.
  • If you’re taking a medication for schizophrenia, talk to your doctor about getting a simple blood sugar test once a year to help monitor your health.

Mental Health MedicationsNational Alliance on Mental Illness..
General Medication GuidelinesThe Cleveland Clinic Foundation. (2014)

Many people turn to smoking to help them cope with stress and anxiety. Smoking is an addiction, and quitting can be difficult. We understand and want to help.

Treatment

There are many treatments available to help you quit smoking. Use the information below as a guide to help you understand your treatment options. Always speak with your doctor to determine the best treatment for you.

Psychological Counseling
Counseling, also known as talk therapy, can be an effective way to stop smoking. It involves regular visits with a behavioral health professional who will help you learn ways to cope with stress, manage your symptoms and help you quit. It is important to feel comfortable and safe with your behavioral health professional, and you may need to talk with a few to find one who feels right. Find a provider who can help you stop smoking and tobacco use for good.

Medication
There are medications available to help make quitting smoking easier such as nicotine patches, gum, lozenges, bupropion and Chantix. These are covered for members with EmblemHealth pharmacy benefit coverage.* Make sure to talk to your doctor about which medicine is right for you.

* Coverage may vary by plan. Sign in to your account to review the pharmacy benefits for your particular plan.

Ready for help?

If you smoke, we are here to help you stop. Our Tobacco-Free Quit-Smoking Program is available to you at no extra cost and is designed to support you as you try to quit smoking for good.

To join this program*, New York State residents please call 1-866-NY-QUITS (1-866-697-8487), non-residents of New York State, please call 1-877-500-2393, Monday through Friday between 8 am and 9 pm, Saturday between 9 am and 7 pm and Sunday between 9 am and 5 pm. TTY/TDD users should call 711.

*GHI NY City PPO (active and retirees) should call the National Quitline at 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669).

Substance use and addiction is a condition that affects many individuals and families. It involves the misuse of alcohol, medication and other illicit substances. Many times these are used to escape from life’s problems, but can actually make these problems worse.

Symptoms

There are many different symptoms of substance use and addiction. You or someone you know may have some or all of the following, and experience them to different degrees.

  • Frequently using alcohol, medication or illicit substances
  • Cravings or strong desire to use which makes it difficult to think about anything else
  • Taking larger amounts or over a longer period of time than was intended
  • Built up tolerance; increased quantities or strength is needed to achieve the previous effects
  • Physical dependence; withdrawal symptoms when stopping
  • Constant desire or unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control the substance use
  • Continued need to use despite physical, relationship, psychological, impaired functioning, social or work problems it causes
  • Changes in behavior and relationships

Treatment

There are many ways to treat substance use. Use the information below as a guide to help you understand your treatment options. With any treatment, the sooner you start, the sooner you can start to feel better. Always speak with your doctor to determine the best treatment for you.

Psychological Counseling
Counseling, also known as talk therapy, can be an effective way to treat substance abuse and addiction. It involves regular visits with a mental health professional who will help you learn ways to cope with stress, manage your symptoms and take the proper steps to live substance-free. It is important to feel comfortable and safe with your mental health professional, and you may need to talk with a few to find one who feels right.

Medication
Medication can be an effective tool in helping to treat substance use. It works by helping to balance chemicals in the brain, which can help reduce cravings and help you feel more like yourself again.

Tips about medications

  • Keep taking your medication as prescribed. Most side effects are minor and temporary. Discuss any side effects with your doctor so you can decide together if the treatment is right for you.
  • Some medications may take time to work. You may not feel better immediately, so it is important to give them time.1
  • Medications are most effective when taken at the same time each day.2 Try setting an alarm, using a pill box or taking your medication with regular activities to help make it a part of your daily routine.

Find out if you may have a substance use disorder

This screening can help determine if you are experiencing symptoms of a substance use disorder. We encourage you to share your results with your health care provider.

Take this screening >

Ready for help?

If you or someone you know is struggling with substance use, call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Hotline. It is free, confidential and available twenty four hours a day/seven days a week. Call 1-800-662-4357 for immediate help. If you use a TTY/TDD, please call 1-800-487-4889 or visit SAMHSA for more information.

1 Medication Assisted Treatment for Substance Use DisordersSubstance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2014)
2 General Medication GuidelinesThe Cleveland Clinic Foundation. (2014)

Once you are out of the hospital

Like any medical condition, mental health and substance use issues may require hospitalization to be treated and stabilized. But your care does not stop once you leave the hospital. We will be with you every step of the way so you continue to improve, feel better and reduce your chance of future hospital visits.

What should you do after you leave the hospital?

You should see a mental health provider within one week of leaving the hospital, even if you feel better. The provider will check to see that the progress you made in the hospital continues. Your provider will also make sure you are following a care plan that is right for you.

Need an appointment?

If you need help finding a mental health professional, we’re here when you need us. We can also help you make your appointment.